SodaStream products | Mar 2011 | Photographed by Who ProfitsSodaStream factory in the illegal settlement of Maale Adumim in the West Bank | October 2011 | Photographed by Who ProfitsSodaStream factory in the illegal settlement of Maale Adumim in the West Bank | October 2011 | Photographed by Who ProfitsMislabeling by SodaStream in Sweden: The machines are manufactured in the occupied teritorries, yet the lable the company tries to hide reads: made in airport city | March 2011 | Photographed by Swedish activistsMislabeling by SodaStream in Sweden: The machines are manufactured in the occupied teritorries, yet the lable the company tries to hide reads: made in airport city | March 2011 | Photographed by Swedish activistsMislabeling by SodaStream in Sweden: The machines are manufactured in the occupied teritorries, yet the label reads: made in airport city | March 2011 | Photographed by Swedish activists
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Manufactures and distributes home beverage carbonating devices and flavorings for soft drinks. 

The main plant of the company is located in the industrial zone of Mishor Edomim, which is an Israeli settlement in the West Bank. Despite this the company mislabels its products as "Made in Israel".

The Mishor Edomim industrial zone directly serves the nearby settlement of Ma'ale Adumim as a source of revenue and employment, where the settlement receives SodaStream’s municipal taxes payments. The particularly strategic location of the settlement and its industrial zone strengthens Israeli control over the West Bank by ensuring continuous Israeli control between the settlements of East Jerusalem and the Jordan Valley.

SodaStream enjoys the structural advantages of production in Israeli settlements, including: low rent, special tax incentives, lax enforcement of environmental and labor protection laws. It also relies heavily on the exploitative nature of employment under occupation.

According to Kav LaOved (an NGO committed to protecting labor rights), between 2008-2010 the workers in the SodaStream factory suffered from harsh working conditions, low wages, and 'revolving door' employment policies. In April 2008, SodaStream fired a group of 17 Palestinian workers, who protested their work conditions and low wages. Following the publication of the story in the Swedish press and the intervention of Kav LaOved, they were rehired with better conditions, dismissed for the second time in 2010, and rehired again. However, two leaders of this struggle lost their jobs permanently.

In response to growing public criticism, the company repeatedly claimed to be an ethical employer and the sole provider of income for its Palestinian workers and their families. 

Despite SodaStream’s statement that all workers "work side by side with equal wages, equal benefits and equal opportunities", the discriminatory and exploitative working conditions in the company's facilities continue. On July 2014, SodaStream fired 60 Palestinian workers, who complained about receiving insufficient food to break the Ramadan fast. On September 2014, Bedouin women employees at SodaStream’s new factory in the Negev (within Israel proper) complained that they are required to toil 12-hour shifts.

In October 2014, the company published a statement on a future withdrawal from the occupied Palestinian territories and the relocation of its production lines to a new factory within Israel. Still, for the moment SodaStream's main production facility continues to operate in the settlement industrial zone of Mishor Edomim.

To read the full report about SodaStream as a case study of settlement production click here.